Classical Receptions JournalCC’s Anastasia Bakogianni talks with Lorna Hardwick, Emerita Professor at the Open University, about classical reception. Lorna has worked and published extensively in this research area. She is the author of Translating Words, Translating Cultures (Duckworth: 2000) and Reception Studies (Greece and Rome: 2003); she has also co-edited three significant collections Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds (Oxford University Press: 2007), A Companion to Classical Receptions (Blackwell: 2008) and more recently Classics in the Modern World: A Democratic Turn? (OUP: 2013). In addition she promotes new work in the field in her role as the general editor of the Classical Receptions Journal (OUP).

Classics in Post-Colonial WorldsTogether with James I. Porter she is also the general editor of Classical Presences (OUP), a series devoted to publishing monographs and edited collections that explore the multi-faceted field of classical reception. Lorna’s recent work investigates aspects of the reception of historiography. Her essays on this topic include ‘Moving targets, Modern contests: Marathon and cultural memory’, in C. Carey and M. Edwards, eds. (2013) Marathon – 2,500 Years, London, BICS, pp. 275-288, and ‘Concepts’, in N. Morley and C. Lee, eds., Handbook to the Reception of Thucydides, Malden MA and Oxford, Wiley-Blackwell (2014 forthcoming).

Persian Warriors at the Ishtar Gate, from before the fourth century BCE. Pergamon Museum/Vorderasiatisches Museum, Berlin. Photo Mohammed Shamma (2003). Used under CC-BY terms. All rights reserved.
Marathon – 2,500 Years (see above for full details of book): Persian Warriors at the Ishtar Gate, from before the fourth century BCE. Pergamon Museum/Vorderasiatisches Museum, Berlin. Photo Mohammed Shamma (2003). Used under CC-BY terms. All rights reserved.

Classical Receptions JournalIn this interview Lorna talks about the explosion of interest in the performance, adaptation and poetic responses to classical material in the last part of the 20th century. The reasons for this and its effects both on the creative arts and on how classics might be perceived in the future will be the concern of future cultural historians.
Classics in the Modern WorldTo support this, Lorna has developed databases that preserve information that might otherwise be
ephemeral. Documentation and analysis of key examples of drama and poetry can be freely accessed on the website of the Reception of Classical Texts Project.

Follow this link or click on the image below to watch our interview

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