Cacoyannis' Iphigenia (1977)

Tragic Anti-War Spectacles, with Anastasia Bakogianni

CC’s own Anastasia is interviewed by Sonya Nevin about her work for War as Spectacle. Anastasia tells us how Greek tragedy was co-opted by film director Michael Cacoyannis to oppose war and violence in his Euripidean cinematic trilogy (Electra, The Trojan Women and Iphigenia). With grateful thanks to Sonya Nevin and Steve K. Simons for…

hoplites

Greek Hoplites March Again, with Sonya Nevin

CC’s Anastasia catches up with Sonya Nevin to discuss two Panoply animations featuring Greek hoplites. Sonya talks to us about the spectacle of Greek warfare and how she and Steve K. Simons sought to bring it to life again. To learn more about Panoply’s work animating ancient warfare read Sonya’s chapter in War as Spectacle. With grateful…

drawing of children reading

Classics and Children’s Literature, with Helen Lovatt

This week on Classics Confidential, Dr Helen Lovatt from the University of Nottingham tells us about her exciting project on Classics and children’s literature. Why is it so important for us to study children’s books with classical themes? Find out by watching our interview! ps. Which classically-themed books did you love reading as a child? Share your favourite titles in our…

Senate House, London

Meet the Director of the Institute of Classical Studies

CC’s Anastasia met Professor Greg Woolf to talk about his new job as the Director of the Institute of Classical Studies. Located in Senate House at the heart of Bloomsbury in London the Institute and its world-class research library is a meeting place for all things Classical. As Greg reveals to us the main objective of the institute…

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Plutarch and Tolstoy, with Alexei Zadorozhny

The Russian writer Leo Tolstoy was an avid reader of the Greek and Latin classics. In this interview, Dr Alexei Zadorozhny of the University of Liverpool tells us how and why Tolstoy drew on the work of the Greek historian Plutarch in his great novel War and Peace, which he was writing in the 1860s. Follow this link to watch…