Food for thought…with Zena Kamash and Lisa Lodwick

The Food for Thought project had a stall at the Festival of Ancient Tales, and we caught up with Zena Kamash and Lisa Lodwick for a quick chat at the end of the evening. Their project explores the links between food and memory in both the past and the present, and (as Zena explains at the end of the interview) they would love to hear about YOUR food-related memories. You can find out more on the project blog, as well as liking the project on Facebook and following it on Twitter @notjustdormice.

But first, follow this link to watch our interview!

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Barbara Bell (and Minimus) at the Festival of Ancient Tales

Barbara Bell wrote the first Minimus book 20 years ago, and since then this wonderful Latin guide for children (with illustrations by Helen Forte) has sold 147,00 copies worldwide. In this interview Barbara tells us about the past, present and future of Minimus and the Primary Latin Project, and shares some very welcome news about the future of ancient languages in UK primary schools.

You can find out more about Barbara and Helen’s work on the Minimus website. The Minimus books are published by Cambridge University Press.

Follow this link to watch our interview!

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Tom Holland at the Festival of Ancient Tales

We caught up with author Tom Holland just before he gave his talk at the Festival of Ancient Tales on Friday, and asked him how he’d first become interested in Classics. Follow this link to hear Tom talk about his childhood passions for Asterix and dinosaurs, and his new book about the Roman Emperors!

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Caroline Lawrence at the Festival of Ancient Tales

the-night-raidOne of the first people we bumped into at the Festival of Ancient Tales was writer Caroline Lawrence, who told us about her new book THE NIGHT RAID, and shared her love of the city of Naples.

Follow this link to watch our interview!

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A Festival of Ancient Tales, with Lorna Robinson

ICARUS

Yesterday was the long-awaited Festival of Ancient Tales at the East Oxford Community Classics Centre. Over the next few days we’ll be posting a series of interviews with speakers and participants, but for starters here’s a short introductory chat with the festival organiser, Lorna Robinson. Thanks to everyone who appears in the video – it was really great meeting you all at the festival!

Follow this link to watch our interview

 

 

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Acting the Amazons, with Laura Martin-Simpson

Classics Confidential recently went to London to chat with actress and classicist Laura Martin-Simpson about a new theatre production based on ancient stories about the Amazons, ICONS. In 2013 Laura founded Blazon Theatre together with director Rachel Bagshaw, and they were  awarded an Arts Council England Grant for the initial stages of research and development for a play about the Amazons. In this interview, Laura talks about some of the ideas and themes explored in the play, and gives us some behind-the-scenes glimpses of Blazon’s collaboration with writer Paula B. Stanic and others. You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook for updates about this production, but for now, follow this link to watch our interview!

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A Cuban Electra, with Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos

Teresa María Rojas (Clitemnestra Plá), Gerardo Barrios (Egisto Don), Marilyn Romero (Electra Garrigó), and José Zubero (Agamenón Garrigó), in Electra Garrigó. Copyright: The Cuban Theater Digital Archive.

Teresa María Rojas (Clitemnestra Plá), Gerardo Barrios (Egisto Don), Marilyn Romero (Electra Garrigó), and José Zubero (Agamenón Garrigó), in Electra Garrigó. Copyright: The Cuban Theater Digital Archive.

In the last interview recorded after the Greeks and Romans on the Latin American Stage conference CC’s Anastasia Bakogianni talks with Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos about a Cuban reception of the myth of Electra. Virgilio Piñera reconfigured the ancient story of the tragic heroine by drawing principally on Sophocles’ play, but also on the versions of Aeschylus and Euripides as well as on modern receptions of the tale, to create his own Electra Garrigó (1941).

Konstantinos tells us about Piñera, the first playwright to situate Electra in a Cuban setting and to make radical changes to the ancient plot. Piñera tried to create a new national theatre for Cuba by going back to the origins of the art form through recourse to Greek drama rather than perpetuating the models of the Spanish colonial past. Konstantinos talks about the play’s hostile reception when it premiered in 1948, but he also tells us how, on account of the Revolution, subsequent performances of Electra Garrigó gradually established Piñera as a major Cuban playwright and encouraged other dramatists to turn to Greek drama for inspiration.

Follow this link to watch our interview, and to learn more about the radical changes that Piñera made to the ancient story. Join us to discover why one critic described the play as ‘a spit ball thrown at Olympus’.

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